When the markets were booming: Why it’s not going to last

When the markets were booming: Why it’s not going to last

In 2008, I was the youngest member of the European Parliament, and was a bit of a young gun.

The markets were surging.

It was the first time I’d ever experienced anything like this.

I remember saying to my colleagues that we had to get out of our homes and be in the streets to see it happen.

It’s been three years now, and it hasn’t changed much.

The European stock market has grown by nearly a third since the crash, but the eurozone still has a way to go to catch up with the United States and the United Kingdom, which are still in recession.

That’s because the European economy has grown at about twice the rate of the United Nations’ index of economic growth.

The United States, the United kingdom, and France are in the midst of their deepest recessions in years.

But the euro area has grown faster, with a much higher rate of growth.

That means that the rest of the world has been watching and waiting for the U.S. and Britain to hit their growth targets and get back on track.

The U.K. and the U

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